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Physical and Mental Health

Twelve causes and treatments of a swollen eyelid

A swollen eyelid is more than just a cosmetic annoyance. It can be terrifying, particularly if the swelling is severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to see.

Most causes of swollen eyelids are harmless, but seemingly minor problems can be quite serious. So, if a person has swollen eyelids, it is a good idea for them to seek care from an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

If someone has experienced swollen eyelids before, it is probably safe for them to treat the condition at home for a few days.

1. Stye

A stye (hordeolum) is an infection of a gland in the eyelid. The most common type of stye infects the tear glands that are at the base of the eyelashes. Styes also sometimes occur inside the eyelid due to infected oil glands.

Styes usually begin as red, itchy, painful, swollen lumps. Over the course of a few hours or a few days, they start to resemble a pimple. Some have a white head.

In most cases, the infection only affects a single tear or oil gland and requires no treatment. Warm compresses can help with the pain.

People should avoid eye products, including makeup and eye creams until the stye disappears. They should also never try to pop the stye as this can spread the infection and damage the eye.

Antibiotics may help in the following situations:

  • several styes appear at once
  • the stye is very painful
  • the symptoms worsen
  • a fever develops
  • vision is impaired

If a person experiences any of these symptoms with a stye, they should contact an eye doctor.

2. Chalazion

A chalazion looks like a stye, but it is not an infection. Instead, a chalazion occurs when an oil gland in the eyelid gets clogged.

People who have had one chalazion tend to get more, and the bumps can grow quite large. However, chalazia rarely hurt. They typically express on their own after several days, much like a pimple.

Warm compresses can help a chalazion clear more quickly.

When chalazia grow very large, they can interfere with vision and may become painful. It can also be difficult to tell the difference between a chalazion, a stye, or an eye infection.

If the bump does not go away after a few days or there are other signs of an infection, such as a fever, a person should contact an eye doctor.

3. Allergies

If itchy, red, watery eyes accompany a swollen eyelid, the cause could be an eye allergy. Dust, pollen, and other common allergens can irritate the eyes, triggering an allergic reaction.

Eye allergies are rarely dangerous, but they can be annoying.

Avoiding known allergens is the best form of treatment, but some people get relief from taking antihistamines, such as Benadryl. Over-the-counter eye drops, which are available to buy online, can also help with itchiness and dryness, but if symptoms persist, people should contact an eye doctor. The doctor may recommend allergy testing or prescription treatments.

4. Exhaustion

Exhaustion or fatigue can make eyelids look puffy and swollen. Water retention overnight can also affect the eyelids. It can make them look swollen and puffy in the morning, particularly if the person did not sleep well.

Applying a cold compress while lying with the head elevated on a pillow may help. Drinking a glass of water may also help reduce fluid retention and swelling.

5. Crying

Crying can rupture tiny blood vessels in the eyes and eyelids, particularly if crying is forceful or long-lived.

Swollen eyelids that occur after a person has been crying can be the result of fluid retention, which is caused by the increase in blood flow to the area around the eyes. …….. Continue Reading…………

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